Nonfiction Books

How to Feed the World

Cover_How to Feed the World

By 2050, we will have nine billion mouths to feed in a world profoundly altered by environmental change. How can we meet this challenge? In How to Feed the World, a diverse group of experts from Purdue University break down this crucial question by tackling big issues one-by-one. Covering population, water, land, climate change, technology, food systems, trade, food waste and loss, health, social buy-in, communication, and, lastly, the ultimate challenge of achieving equal access to food, the book reveals a complex web of factors that must be addressed in order to reach global food security.

Against the Odds: A Path Forward for Rural America

Against the Odds Book Cover

When Bruce’s school principal told his parents he was too smart to be a logger, everything changed. Set apart from a family heritage society had deemed not ‘good enough’ for a smart son, Bruce’s childhood was tortured by the thought of leaving a life he loved. Dutifully, he moved away, went to college and got a job in a city. Until he and his wife, fed up with their ill-suited life, shucked all social expectations and moved their family back to Libby, Montana. Expecting to settle into a hard but rewarding life in logging, Bruce’s family and community were rocked by a growing antagonism towards their industry. Soon, he was thrust into the forefront of a national debate in which loggers were denigrated for destroying the environment.

The Communication Scarcity in Agriculture

The Communication Scarcity in Agriculture, Jessica Eise and Whitney HoddeToday, the general public craves information on food and agriculture with an unprecedented passion. But the agricultural sector, unaccustomed to an interested and inquisitive society, has largely failed to respond to the public’s demands for information. Instead, corporations, time-pressed journalists, bloggers, media celebrities, film-makers, authors and concerned consumers jumped in to fill the void. Food is emotional, and these players – some well-intentioned and others not – got a lot of traction playing off consumer fears of the unknown.